les-immersions:

Laura Letinsky

les-immersions:

Laura Letinsky

golddiggerr:

me-and-you-just-us-two-xoxo:

Hey guys, this little angel lives in my area and just went through her first round of chemo without her mom by her side because she’s pregnant and can’t be around the radiation. This angel isn’t doing so well so I’m asking to please pray for her. Please reblog to spread this around to get more prayers from everybody. The power of prayer is amazing. Thanks.

Prayers Up!!

golddiggerr:

me-and-you-just-us-two-xoxo:

Hey guys, this little angel lives in my area and just went through her first round of chemo without her mom by her side because she’s pregnant and can’t be around the radiation. This angel isn’t doing so well so I’m asking to please pray for her. Please reblog to spread this around to get more prayers from everybody. The power of prayer is amazing. Thanks.

Prayers Up!!

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.


Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

(via frijoliz)

Disturbing as it may be, what we are witnessing today in more and more blatant forms is the constant promotion of raunch culture in the name of women’s sexual liberation. Amongst those who indulge in this perversity are female chauvinists, or what I would like to identify as ‘comprador women’—those women who come to employ the strategy of objectifying theirs and other women’s bodies in the attempt to attain the same elevated status and financial gains of the dominant group (in this case, male entrepreneurs and professionals). Through their work these women not only objectify their own bodies but also those of other women, and more often than not, advocate that women should embrace capitalism and get as much power and money for themselves as they can in order to fight oppression. Examples of female chauvinists or comprador women include: the woman entrepreneur who unhesitatingly uses her class power to unleash aggression on both male and female employees; the woman journo at Playboy, Cosmopolitan and Femina magazines who earns a killing by telling women what’s the “in thing”; the woman fashion designer whose fashion line popularizes Size Zero and whose one flick of the hand sends shivers down the chain of garment workers employed in developing and under-developed countries; the Ekta Kapoor-kind of women producers whose showcase-it-all movies have popularized movie plots evolving around sex scandals; the entire pool of bourgeois artists (Kareena Kapoor, Malaika Arora Khan, Priyanka Chopra and the likes) who adamantly claim their semi-nude bodies on billboards and the silver screen do not encourage a sexist culture; etc. Ultimately then, the interests of women capitalists and some upward mobile women professionals are linked to the perpetuation of a biased, sexist culture and gender oppression of the majority of women.

Another brand of feminist practitioners includes those who have come to seek ‘empowerment’ in the reclamation of patriarchal feminity, and hence, have come to defend and celebrate this feminity as a feminist action. The general misconception amongst them is that women are exercising an active choice/agency when indulging in patriarchal feminity such as by wearing body-hugging clothes, painting nails, getting piercings, going for implants, looking ‘pretty’ in order to feel powerful, participating in ‘slut walks’, and even reclaiming disempowering terms or language like slut/whore/bitch/cunt/behanchod/chutia. Subsequently, the denial of such choice to indulge in patriarchal feminity is read as oppression and is seen as antagonistic to the goal of feminism, let alone any emancipatory politics.

Such behaviour and politics is troubling because of its ridiculous assumption that women who dress in hyper-feminine ways are beating the patriarchal, sexist structuring of society at its own game. Defenders of such positions also tend to argue that sexualized dressing challenges the predominant image of the docile, ‘traditional’ woman imbued with feminine respectability. For this reason the ‘right’ to hyper-femme dressing has emerged almost like a non-negotiable demand within the current feminist movement. However, it is worth remembering that both the commodified woman and the normative woman or bhadramahila are creations of capitalist society. Both are forms of a woman’s sexual being that are used to keep each other alive. While the former is often despised, she is still desired. Similarly, while the latter is often worshipped, she is also shunned. Hence, both the commodified woman and the bhadramahila are feminine roles which should be smashed rather than incorporated and defended.


Maya John, Class Societies and Sexual Violence   (via sissyspacecunt)

I have green eyes I must be aryan

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fuck saddam and Maryam rajavi

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me: maman ma ariyayi hastim?
her: che farghi mikone, bayad adam bashim

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myvoicemyright:

Acid attack survivors in India model new clothing range for powerful photoshoot

Survivors of acid attacks in India have become the face of a new clothing range designed by a woman who had acid thrown in her face while she was asleep four years ago.Delhi-based designer Rupa and her friends Rita, Sonam, Laxmi and Chanchal modelled the clothes from her new range, Rupa Designs, for photographer Rahul Saharan.

Rupa suffered extensive injuries when her stepmother threw acid in her face while she was sleeping in 2008.

She was allegedly left without any medical aid for six hours before her uncle found her and transported her to hospital, where she underwent eleven operations and spent three months being cared for.

Many representations of Iranian people in Western narratives have been racist, misaligned, or one-dimensional. These characters range from the evil husband ‘Moody’ Mahmoody in Not Without My Daughter, to the patriarchal and stubborn Massoud Behrani in House of Sand and Fog. And while they’re not always written as villains, terrorists, or flawed characters, more often than not Iranian characters come off as types or ciphers (like Sahar in Argo), and rarely are they the main character. With The Past, the protagonist Ahmad has not only been written by an Iranian (Farhadi), the character is played by an Iranian actor, Ali Mosaffa. Thus the film illustrates an Iranian experience rarely seen in productions catering to a Western audience—that of an authentically created Iranian protagonist in a European diegesis.
An Iranian in Paris by Tina Hassannia for Guernica Magazine (via stopwhitewashing)
imagesofwar:

Operation Red Dawn

imagesofwar:

Operation Red Dawn

farsizaban:

An old Mural in Tehran honoring Iranian soldiers with different religious backgrounds who died serving in Iran-Iraq War
Top: Alfred Sarkis Ordoshahi (Assyrian Christian)
Left: Haraj Tourosian (Armenian Christian)
Middle: Shahram Zarini (Jewish)
Right: Kaikhosrow Kaikhosravi (Zoroastrian)
Bottom: Nobel Bazochahr (Assyrian Christian)

farsizaban:

An old Mural in Tehran honoring Iranian soldiers with different religious backgrounds who died serving in Iran-Iraq War

Top: Alfred Sarkis Ordoshahi (Assyrian Christian)

Left: Haraj Tourosian (Armenian Christian)

Middle: Shahram Zarini (Jewish)

Right: Kaikhosrow Kaikhosravi (Zoroastrian)

Bottom: Nobel Bazochahr (Assyrian Christian)

littlemissconceptions I got a ball captive ring lmao :-) What abt you?

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